Cabaret Tip Tuesday at McElrath Cabaret: Read A Good Cabaret Book For Inspiration–Join Us!

 

Welcome to McElrath Cabaret–We hope you enjoy our cabaret blog!

 

With the holidays being such a busy time, I’m finding it a little hard to keep up the pace of the blog entries here.  I will do my best, but I am only human, and I may miss a post here and there; such was the case last Friday.  We caught a Commedia del’ Arte version of A Christmas Carol, and enjoyed it very much.  We are also enjoying some festivities closer to home–hosted a piano bar/holiday party/Betty Grable birthday party last night at our house, and it was so much fun!  It’s always a blast to get together with others who like to sing or enjoy listening to song, and we had a great time.  And I’m participating in a Viewpoints acting class every week as well, so time is flying by.

 

My tip for you today is:

 

Read a good cabaret book for inspiration.

 

I have been enjoying a book this past week that Richard Skipper recommended that I read.  It’s called The Night and The Music, by Deborah Grace Winer, whom I understand is or at least was a booker for one of the cabaret rooms in New York City.  Thank you, Richard, for the tip on this book!

 

 

It tells the story of how three amazing women made their cabaret careers come to life, and they include Julie Wilson, Rosemary Clooney and Barbara Cook!  I am so encouraged by the fact that every one of these women, although they had a great deal of success in entertainment when they were younger, ended up having to basically recreate themselves in their middle years and eventually became huge stars in the world of cabaret once they’d hit middle age.  Cabaret definitely lends itself to those who can tell the mature stories in the song lyrics of standards in such a way that conveys that they understand what those words mean, because of their life experiences as well as their imaginations, and that experience is just a part of getting older, and each of these ladies are and were expert storytellers in song.  Included in this book are wonderful stories about past memorable cabaret shows, and background into their lives.  It is the kind of book that I find very difficult to put down–it’s that good, and as far as I am concerned, recommended cabaret reading for you!

 

I want to share a favorite song from each of these great cabaret entertainers with you.

 

First, here is the stunning Julie Wilson, accompanied by William Roy, with some Cy Coleman:

 

And next is the fabulous Rosemary Clooney with “Why Shouldn’t I?”, and introduced by Jimmy Durante:

And finally the incomparable Barbara Cook with “Till There Was You” from the 1987 Tony Awards:

 

Have you read any good cabaret books lately that you found to be inspirational?  Let us know in the comments!

 

Hope these Tuesday cabaret tips help–let us know what other topics you’d like to see us cover here, and we’ll do our best to work through them!

 

As a cabaret singer, what would you add to this conversation?  Leave us a note about it in the comments below—we always love to hear from our readers!

 

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We appreciate your support!

Till next time,

Disclosure:  The links to Amazon.com are affiliate links, but the opinions expressed in this post are entirely my own.

Weekly Post Lineup At McElrath Cabaret:

Tuesdays:  Cabaret Tip Tuesday

Wednesdays:  Ask A Cabaret Question

Fridays:  Cabaret Through Time

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About Athena at McElrath Cabaret

Athena McElrath is an entertainer with a love for theatre and singing. She enjoys delving in the area of historical cabaret, researching the singers and clubs that were in business from before 1920 to the present, in New York and beyond.
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